Conditions

  • Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Arthritis

    This condition, also called AC joint arthrosis, is a degeneration of the joint at the top of the shoulder where the acromion meets the clavicle.

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  • Anatomy of the Shoulder

    The muscles and joints of the shoulder make it the most mobile joint in the human body.

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  • Biceps Tendinitis

    This condition is an irritation or inflammation of the biceps tendon at the shoulder. The biceps tendon helps to stabilize the humerus and aids in activities that involve overhead motion such as tennis or throwing a ball.

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  • Biceps Tendon Rupture

    This condition is a tear of one of the tendons that anchor the biceps muscle to the shoulder. The upper end of the biceps muscle is divided into two separate sections called the long head and the short head. The long head passes over the head of the humerus and attaches to the glenoid. The […]

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  • Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder (Degenerative Calcification)

    This painful condition occurs when calcium deposits form in tendons of the rotator cuff. These tendons and surrounding tissues in the shoulder become inflamed. This condition typically affects adults.

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  • Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder (Reactive Calcification)

    This painful condition occurs when calcium deposits form in tendons of the rotator cuff. These tendons and surrounding tissues in the shoulder become inflamed. Reactive calcification often develops in young people, but it can affect people of all ages.

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  • Fracture of the Collarbone (Clavicle)

    This condition occurs when a part of the clavicle, commonly called the collarbone, is fractured. A broken collarbone is fairly common, and occurs most frequently in children and athletes.

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  • Fractures of the Greater Tuberosity

    This condition is a fracture of the bony bump that is located opposite of the head of the humerus. This type of fracture can interfere with the rotator cuff.

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  • Fractures of the Shoulder Blade (Scapula)

    This condition is a break of the scapula, the large, flat, triangular bone that contains the shoulder socket. Because the scapula is well protected by the muscles of the shoulder, scapula fractures are uncommon.

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  • Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

    This condition is a loss of motion or stiffness in the shoulder, usually accompanied by pain in the joint. Frozen shoulder is most common in people between the ages of 40 and 60, but can afflict anyone regardless of gender, arm preference or occupation.

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  • Glenoid Labrum Tears

    This injury is a tear of the labrum, a thick band of cartilage that lines the rim of the glenoid (which is commonly called the shoulder socket). The labrum cushions the head of the humerus and holds it securely to the glenoid, stabilizing the joint.

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  • Hill-Sachs Lesion

    This condition is a traumatic fracture of the humeral head that leaves an indentation in the bone. This changes the shape of the humeral head and can interfere with normal arm motion.

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  • Loose Shoulder (Multidirectional Instability)

    This condition occurs when the tissue that forms a capsule around the shoulder joint stretches and can no longer effectively keep the ball of the humerus within the shoulder socket. Patients with loose shoulder may experience frequent shoulder dislocations.

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  • Muscle Imbalance in the Shoulder

    This condition is an abnormal relationship between the muscles that mobilize and the muscles that stabilize the joint. Normally these muscles work together to move and stabilize the arm. When these muscles become imbalanced, the mobilizing muscles begin to overpower the weaker stabilizing muscles. This can interfere with normal movement of the shoulder, causing instability.

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  • Muscle Strain of the Upper Back (Trapezius Strain)

    This common injury is a stretching or tearing of the trapezius. This large muscle group spans the upper back, shoulders and neck. These muscles are commonly called the “trap” muscles.

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  • Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder

    Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis of the shoulder can severely impact a person’s lifestyle.

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  • Osteomyelitis

    This condition is an infection of the bone cells or the bone marrow that can lead to death of the bone tissue. If not treated properly, it can spread from the original site of infection to other parts of the body. In adults, osteomyelitis commonly affects the spine, pelvis and feet. In children, it commonly […]

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  • Proximal Humerus Fracture (Broken Shoulder)

    This condition is a fracture of the head of the humerus – the “ball” of the shoulder’s ball-and-socket.

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  • Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) of the Shoulder

    Rheumatoid arthritis, a condition of the immune system that can attack joints throughout the body, commonly affects the shoulder. Over time, it can destroy cartilage and bone in the joint.

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  • Rotator Cuff Injuries

    The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that cover the head of the humerus and hold it in the shoulder socket. When rotator cuff tendons become damaged, the shoulder can become stiff, sore or lose mobility. Injuries are often caused by direct damage, such as a traumatic fall or repetitive overhead motions. […]

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  • Rotator Cuff Tears

    The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that cover the head of the humerus and hold it securely inside the shoulder socket. The cuff helps maintain joint stability while allowing the arm to lift and rotate. A tear of the rotator cuff can be painful and can interfere with shoulder movement. Four […]

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  • Shoulder Dislocations

    This condition occurs when the head of the upper arm bone, the humerus, slips out of the socket formed by the scapula at the shoulder joint. Because the shoulder is not as stable as other joints, this injury is common.

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  • Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    This condition occurs when the tendons of the rotator cuff, along with the subacromial bursa, become compressed against a bony scapula protrusion called the acromion. As these tissues continually rub against bone, they become irritated and inflamed.

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  • Shoulder Separation

    This condition is an injury to the joint at the top of the shoulder where the acromion meets the clavicle, called the acromioclavicular (or AC) joint. The ligaments that hold these bones together are partially or completely torn, allowing the bones to separate.

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  • SLAP Tear (Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior Tear)

    This condition is a tear of the labrum in the shoulder joint. The labrum is a ring of cartilage around the shoulder socket that stabilizes the head of the humerus. A SLAP tear occurs at the point where the biceps tendon attaches to the labrum.

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  • Snapping Scapula Syndrome

    This condition, also known as scapulocostal or scapulothoracic syndrome, occurs when the scapula catches on the muscles or bones of the chest wall. Instead of gliding smoothly across the chest wall as the arm is used, the scapula catches and grinds.

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  • Subacromial Bursitis

    This condition is a swelling of the subacromial bursa, a fluid-filled sac that creates a cushion between the acromion and the head of the humerus.

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  • Suprascapular Neuropathy

    This condition is a compression of the suprascapular nerve which can cause instability in the shoulder joint that can lead to more severe problems. The suprascapular nerve is a motor nerve that controls the functions of two of the main muscles on the shoulder blade.

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